“He Should Not Have Resisted Arrest”

Have you ever found yourself face to face with a bear? I’ve personally never had myself, but the simple thought of it is terrifying to me. 

Most likely, I think that I would try to run as fast and far as possible – understandably so: as human beings, we are built for survival; everything we do is instinctively wired so we can make it out alive the most stressful situations.

According to an article by Nicoletta Lanese published in LiveScience.com, Fight or Flight: The Sympathetic Nervous System here’s what’s happening:

Our sympathetic nervous system directs the body’s rapid involuntary response to dangerous or stressful situations. A flash flood of hormones boosts the body’s alertness and heart rate, sending extra blood to the muscles. Breathing quickens, delivering fresh oxygen to the brain, and an infusion of glucose is shot into the bloodstream for a quick energy boost. This response occurs so quickly that people often don’t realize it’s taken place, according to Harvard Medical School.

That said, according to the Human Society of the United States,

“Bears have acute eyesight and hearing. Their sense of smell is seven times greater than a bloodhound’s.”

In the section: “This is what you should do if you encounter a black bear“, one of their advice is: “Stand and face the bear directly. Never run away from or approach him.”

You are basically supposed to remain just here in your terror. Not so easy if you ask.

Well, I think it is a fair assumption that this is how POC feel, especially black males, when stopped by police officers – that is why black parents have The Talk (ain’t about birds and bees).

I hope that you will now understand how insensitive it is to say “He Should Not Have Resisted Arrest”.

On the Way to Oz || Original Tune Exploring Mental Health Breakdown and Recovery

with my Ukulele in Central Park – Pics taken by my sister Roxane

“On the way to Oz” deals with how familial and societal pressure contributes to mental health breakdown – and the role of community and empathy into the road of recovery.

Live version of “On the Way to Oz” – Daphné Mia Essiet © All rights reserved.

Lyrics:

There are places we’ll never let ourself go

And to cope we drink, take drugs, have sex, and scroll 

Up and down until we numb ourselves so cold, so cold 

We pretend to enjoy things we don’t care for

And to cope we tell the world how much it cost, 

And we post until we numb ourselves so cold, so cold

Then one day, the chasm between our heart 

And the reality is so wide we can’t breathe

Then one day the pain we subject our soul

chatters our sanity way too deep 

Some believe that money will quiet their wounds 

When in fact it emphasizes their own flaws

And to cope they wander aimlessly 

in virtual reality 

We keep at it despite red flags and the signs 

Trick ourselves into contortionning our mind

Fool ur friends and hide in plain sight

Til we no longer can lie

Then one day, the chasm between our heart 

And the reality is so wide we can’t breathe

Then one day the pain we subject our soul

chatters our sanity way too deep 

There’s a way to get back t yourself

It’s not easy but

You gotta let it go

And if you want

We can hold each other’s hand

On the yellow brick road

On our way to Oz

And if you want

We can hold each other’s hand

On the yellow brick road

On our way to Oz

You can download a version on my soundcloud

Daphné Mia Essiet © All rights reserved.

https://linktr.ee/daphnemiaessiet

On Women’s Brain, Brain Food and Mental Health – *Bilingual Post – Français & English*

Bilingual Post French/English

Un de mes podcast préféré s’appelle #KwikBrain avec présentateur et spécialiste de l’apprentissage @jimkwik.

Chaque fois que j’écoute son podcast, je me cale confortablement et prends mon cahier de notes puis je réfléchit ce que j’apprends pendant l’episode et essaie de partager.

Je decide donc aujourd’hui de parler – en français (je pense que pas tout le monde parle l’anglais) de l’episode avec docteur Lisa Mosconi neuroscientist et neurologiste, fondatrice de #WomenBrainIntiative, .

Elle nous explique que les femmes sont plus sujettes aux risques liés aux maladies mentales que les hommes. Par exemple les elles souffrent deux fois plus de dépression/anxiéte, 3 fois plus de maladies auto-immune, maux de tête, tumeurs du cerveaux, etc… De plus, 2 patients d’Alzheimer sur 3 sont des femmes.

Cela est du, elle explique, en partie au taux de changement d’hormones notamment en pre-ménaupose/ménaupose. On commence a peine a s’interesser sur la question. En tant que femme, et avec ma formation de diététicienne je suis très intéressée sur la question. Je donc viens de commander son livre “Brain Food” dont je ferai la revu très bientôt.

En attendant pour les personnes bilingues, vous pouvez écouter l’épisode 88 de Kwik Brain sur les applications de Podcast ou sur Youtube “What You Need to Know about Women’s Brains” Je mets tous les liens dessous!!!

English translation:

One of my favorite podcasts is #KwikBrain with host and “brain specialist @JimKwik. Whenever I listen to this podcast, I sit down comfortably and take my notebook, then I reflect on what I have learnt during the episode and share.

Today, I have decided talk about in French (for those who do not speak English) and English of the episode with neuroscientic @Dr_Mosconi founder of #WomensBrainIntiative . 

She explains that women are more subject to the risks associated with mental illness than men. For example, they suffer twice as much from depression / anxiety, 3 times more from autoimmune diseases, headaches, brain tumors, etc. In addition, 2 out of 3 Alzheimer patients are women. This is due, she explains, in part to the rate of hormone change, particularly during pre-menaupose / menaupose. 

We’re just starting to get involved in the issue. 


As a woman in my late 30s and with my training as a dietician, I am obviously very interested in the issue. I just ordered his book “Brain Food” which I will review once I read it.

Please check Episode 88 of Kwik Brain and all the videos I posted!